Pope says: Include parents in Sacramental prep!

August 23, 2008

Earlier this month, Pope Benedict XVI spent some time ‘vacationing’ in Bressanone.  While there, he had a special meeting with the priests from that general area (he does this every year wherever he is ‘vacationing’).  In these meetings, he entertains questions from a few of the priests.  As I was reading his answer to the very last question, these words jumped off the screen into my eyes like lasers during Lasik surgery:

…we naturally must do our best in the context of preparation for the sacraments to reach the parents as well…

 

I did a double-take.  Maybe a triple-take.  It seems to me to be an unmistakably direct confirmation from our Holy Father concerning our efforts to include parents/sponsors in our youth group’s Confirmation retreats.  Perhaps that will help us to convince some of the DRE’s who are on-the-fence about adult participation.

 

Here are the last two paragraphs of the Pope’s answer to that question, with my emphasis added in bold:

Therefore I would say substantially that the sacraments are naturally sacraments of faith: when there is no element of faith, when First Communion is no more than a great lunch with beautiful clothes and beautiful gifts, it can no longer be a sacrament of faith. Yet, on the other hand, if we can still see a little flame of desire for communion in the faith, a desire even in these children who want to enter into communion with Jesus, it seems to me that it is right to be rather broad-minded. Naturally, of course, one purpose of our catechesis must be to make children understand that Communion, First Communion is not a “fixed” event, but requires a continuity of friendship with Jesus, a journey with Jesus. I know that children often have the intention and desire to go to Sunday Mass but their parents do not make this desire possible. If we see that children want it, that they have the desire to go, this seems to me almost a sacrament of desire, the “will” to participate in Sunday Mass. In this sense, we naturally must do our best in the context of preparation for the sacraments to reach the parents as well, and thus to – let us say – awaken in them too a sensitivity to the process in which their child is involved. They should help their children to follow their own desire to enter into friendship with Jesus, which is a form of life, of the future. If parents want their children to be able to make their First Communion, this somewhat social desire must be extended into a religious one, to make a journey with Jesus possible.  

I would say, therefore, that in the context of the catechesis of children, that work with parents is very important. And this is precisely one of the opportunities to meet with parents, making the life of faith also present to the adults, because, it seems to me, they themselves can relearn the faith from the children and understand that this great solemnity is only meaningful, true and authentic if it is celebrated in the context of a journey with Jesus, in the context of a life of faith. Thus, one should endeavour to convince parents, through their children, of the need for a preparatory journey that is expressed in participation in the mysteries and that begins to make these mysteries loved. I would say that this is definitely an inadequate answer, but the pedagogy of faith is always a journey and we must accept today’s situations. Yet, we must also open them more to each person, so that the result is not only an external memory of things that endures but that their hearts that have truly been touched. The moment when we are convinced the heart is touched – it has felt a little of Jesus’ love, it has felt a little the desire to move along these lines and in this direction. That is the moment when, it seems to me, we can say that we have made a true catechesis. The proper meaning of catechesis, in fact, must be this: to bring the flame of Jesus’ love, even if it is a small one, to the hearts of children, and through the children to their parents, thus reopening the places of faith of our time.


Pope’s Mission Message for this year

August 22, 2008

Please take a few minutes to read Pope Benedict’s message for World Mission Sunday 2008, which will be celebrated on October 19.

 

In it, he invites us to join him in reflecting on “the continuing urgency to proclaim the Gospel also in our times.”  He encourages us, in this special year dedicated to St Paul, to see St Paul as “a model of this apostolic commitment.”

 

After explaining “that missionary activity is a response to the love with which God loves us,” he echoes Pope John Paul II:

Dear Brothers and Sisters, “duc in altum“!  Let us set sail in the vast sea of the world and, following Jesus’ invitation, let us cast our nets without fear, confident in his constant aid. 

 

Finally, our Holy Father reminds us that an important part of evangelization is the prayer that supports it:

…may prayer be intensified ever more in the Christian people, the essential spiritual means for spreading among all peoples the light of Christ…